<Back to Attractions in Yorkshire and Humber

Skipton Castle, Yorkshire

A Norman castle of earth and timber was built at Skipton by Robert de Romille, soon after 1090. The defences were later rebuilt in stone. The castle is most closely associated with the Clifford family who were granted the property by Edward II in 1310. Robert Clifford immediately began to strengthen the fortifications but he was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 leaving the work to be continued by his son Roger. The castle is strongly situated on a cliff above the Eller Beck. A twin towered gatehouse remains from the outer defences and within these is an inner curtain wall with six towers positioned close to each other that form a D shape enclosure facing away from the cliff. The space formed by the inner walls contains early Tudor domestic buildings around a small courtyard, the Conduit Court, at the centre of which is a yew tree planted by Lady Anne Clifford in 1659 to mark the completion of restoration work after the Civil War. To the side of this enclosure is a Tudor range added in 1535 by the Earl of Cumberland – this is not open to the public. During the Civil War the castle withstood a three-year siege by Parliamentary forces and surrendered with honour in 1645. Unfortunately the Royalists returned to re-occupy the castle in 1648, and following their removal the castle was partially demolished to prevent any further military use. However the castle did not remain ruined for long. In the 1650’s Lady Anne Clifford began the restoration of the castle, although she was not allowed to return the castle to its previous strength and had to make the walls thinner and the ceiling too weak to support cannon. In some of the towers you can clearly see the much thinner walls of the restoration work on top of the original thick walls.

Official Website : www.skiptoncastle.co.uk

Be Inspired

Castles

Castles were first built in England during the Norman Conquest in the 11th century as fortifications. There are many hundreds of castles throughout England some in good repair whilst others have all but completely disappeared other than a few stones to mark the spot.

Castles

Lakes

England has many lakes spread out over the whole of the country but the most famous must be the Lake District which draws around 16 million visitors each year to admire the beauty of the countryside around the lakesides. Lake Windermere is England’s largest lake.

Lakes

National Parks

The National Parks of England are quite diverse but all have in common one thing and that is their beauty. From the windswept reaches of Dartmoor and Exmoor to the mountains and lakes of the Lake District or the ancient, peaceful tranquility of the New Forest all are worthy of a visit.

National Parks

You may also be Interestd in

Discover a wealth of information on travelling by Motorhome, Caravan or Boat when planning your holiday or trip of a lifetime

Motorhome Guide

Discover the best places to travel in your Motorhome

Find locations to travel in your motorhome as well as all other Motorhome related informtion

Browse Here


Caravan Guide

Discover the best places to travel in your Caravan

Find many locations to travel in your Caravan as well as all other Caravan related informtion here

Browse Here


Baoting Guide

Discover the best places to travel in your Caravan

Find Information on buying boats, taking care of your boat and all boating related information

Browse Here


Discover More

Amazing Destinations

Discover other amazing places to visit from all around the world. Why not create a bucket list and cross them off as you visit. Which of these would be on your list?

Discover More

Promoted Adverts

Which ever way you wish to travel, do it with style!