Regions of Italy

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Discover Information and attractions on all the ares of Italy

The region of Abruzzo, where the north of Italy meets the south, is also one of the most beautiful in the country. Bordered by the Apennines to the west and fringed by the Adriatic on the east, it has some of Italy’s most unspoiled scenery. In the Gran Sasso it has the highest mountain of the Apennine range. L’Aquila is the beautiful capital city and is packed full of art, churches and monuments.

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Lying in the South of Italy is the small region of Basilicata and is divided into the two provinces of Matera and Potenza, Potenza is the regional capital. Basilicata is mostly mountainous with some dramatic scenery and has coastlines on both the Ionian and Thyrrenian Seas. The region’s economy is based  mainly on agriculture.

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The southern Italian region of Calabria (the toe of Italy’s boot) is surrounded on three sides by the splendid crystal waters of Mediterranean Sea: the Ionian Sea is to the east, the Tyhrrenean to the west and the Strait of Messina to the south. As such, the sea is a big part of the region’s culture and cuisine.

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Stretching along the Tyrrhenian Sea, the region of Campania is a beautiful and varied region of Italy with rich, fertile plains, a coastline of bays, coves and rock faces and a wealth of art and culture. Campania is home to Versuvius which looks over the Bay of Naples.

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Emilia Romagna is situtaed in the north-central area of Italy. The region extends from the Adriatic Sea in the east and lies between the River Po to the north and the Apennine Mountains to the south. Emilia Romagna is one of the most fertile and productive regions of Italy. Bologna is the chief city and regional capital.

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Situated in the North-East corner of Italy the region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia overlooks the Adriatic Sea and has borders with Slovenia and Austria. The majestic Dolomites offer a wonderful backdrop to the lakes and valleys below.

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The central Italian region of Lazio holds the jewel in the crown, the Capital city of Rome which draws people from all over the world to marvel at the treasures that it holds. The region itself is also a thing of beauty, it slopes gently down to the Tyrrhenian Sea and is characterized by hills and mountains and the mighty Tiber River.

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The coastal region of Liguria borders France and sits along the blue waters of the Mediterranean. Liguria has impressive mountains, green hills and rocky cliffs and offers lively seaside towns and ports as well as long beaches to soak up the summer sunshine.

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The northern region of Lombardy is bordered by the Alps and Switzerland and is home to Italy’s beautiful Lakes of Como, Garda and Maggiore. Lombardy is not only a great agricultural region but also and industrial one. Lombardy’s major city is Milan.

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Marche is a central region of Italy on the east coast composed of rolling hills and fertile plains at the base of the Apennine mountains. It is bordered by Adriatic Sea in the east. Marche offers beautiful Adriatic beaches and ancient towns perched on hilltops, or nestled deep between rolling farmland.

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Molise is one of the smallest of Italy’s regions and lies in the south of Italy on the ‘ankle’ of the boot. The landscape of Molise includes mountains, hills and a coastline on the Adriatic Sea. The region is sparsely populated. The capital city of Molise is Campobasso.

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Bordered by France and Switzerland, the northern region of Piedmont translates as ‘Foot of the Mountains’ and is almost half covered by mountains. It is surrounded by the Alps on three sides and contains some of the highest mountains and glaciers in Italy. There are also hills, plains, rice paddies, rivers and canals in the beautiful and varied countryside of Piedmont.

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Situated in the south of Italy Puglia is  referred to as being “the heel of Italy”. Puglia lies in the Mediterranean, touched by the Adriatic sea in the north and Ionio in the south, Apulia and enjoys a pleasant climate throughout the year. Inland the region is mainly flat and is mainly agricultural it produces most of the wheat for Italy’s uses and is also the largest Olive oil producer.

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San Marino is not a region of Italy but is officially known as The Republic of San Marino. It is the third smallest state in Europe, after the Vatican and Monaco. It is believed to have been founded around 301 and lays claim to being the world’s oldest republic.  It lies 657 m above sea level with spectacular views of the surrounding countryside and Adriatic coast.

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Lying around 190 miles from Italy, Sardinia is the second largest island Mediterranean after Sicily. Sardinia has a rugged coastline with beautiful white-sand beaches and granite cliffs. Inland the island is mainly mountainous. Sardinia also offers lively resorts, quiet villages, ancient castles and churches.

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The rugged and attractive island of Sicily is separated from the mainland region of Calabria by the 5 km Straits of Messina and is the largest one in the Mediterranean Sea. The famous Mount Etna is Europe’s highest and most active volcano. Sicily is filled with beautiful scenery from long stretches of sandy beaches to the mountains and hills further inland.

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The stunningly beautiful region of Trentino-Alto-Adige in the north of Italy has a wonderful backdrop with the majestic Dolomites. It is also home to a great number of lakes. This region was under Austrian rule for many years and that influence can been seen in its cuisine and a great many people also speak German. Trentino is an agricultural region and produces a great amount of fruits such as apples and grapes for its wines.

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Tuscany is a region on Italy’s west coast, on the Tyrrhenian sea and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world, renowned for is beautiful countryside, spectacular cities all packed full of arts and culture as well as for its cuisine and world-famous wines.

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The green landscape of the region of Umbria is filled with mountains, hills and plains. It includes Lake Trasimeno, central Italy’s largest lake and a large number of fascinating small towns to visit. Perugia is the capital of Umbria.

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Val d’Aosta is a mainly mountainous region of northern Italy. It is bordered by France to the West, Switzerland to the North and the region of Piedmont to the South and East. The regional capital is Aosta.

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The northern region of Veneto has mountainous areas, valleys and coastlines. It is also home to the beautiful, historic city of Venice with its canals, lagoons and islands. The northern part of the region is overlooked by the majestic Dolomites.

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Images of Italy

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Italian lakes. The glorious lakes of the north of Italy are surrounded by picturesque ornamental gardens, ancient villas steeped in history and breathtaking backdrops of majestic snow-capped mountains. From bustling Lake Garda to splendid Lake Maggiore

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Amalfi Coast. The picturesque, world-famous Amalfi Coast is situated in Italy’s southwestern region of Campania and stretches for 30 miles along the southern side of the Sorrento Peninsula from the Gulf of Naples in the north down to Salerno in the south. The Amalfi coastline draws visitors with its small bays and beaches, terraced vineyards, lemon and olive groves, colourful villages and glitzy resorts all overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea.

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Isola Bella. Isola Bella – ‘beautiful island’, is one of the Borromean Islands of Lago Maggiore in north Italy. The island is situated in the Borromean Gulf 400 metres from the lakeside town of Stresa. Isola Bella is 320 metres long by 400 metres wide and is entirely occupied by the Palace and its Italianate garden.

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History in Italy

UNESCO SITES

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War Cemeteries

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